About

Growing Liberia’s Children (GLC) is a faith based nonprofit, grass-roots organization dedicated to making a difference for the new generation of Liberia’s children. GLC builds and restores schools largely destroyed by war and poverty, supports teachers, and coordinates sister-school sponsorship programs and student scholarships so that Liberia’s children can grow and thrive. Please help us change the future of Liberia’s children!

http://workinitfitness.com/outdoor-fitness-lumphini-park-bangkok-thailand/ Our Founder
Growing Liberia’s Children was founded in 2008 by Malia E. Harris, a Liberian educator, minister and refugee, and a group of like-minded individuals who want to help the children of Liberia obtain an education. Mrs. Harris fled the civil war in Liberia in 2000 after her family had been detained and tortured.

Following the return of peace to Liberia, Mrs. Harris inspired members of the First Presbyterian Church in San Diego, California to refurbish a school in Gardnersville, Liberia, which had been bombed several times during the civil war and had fallen into disrepair.

Returning to Liberia in 2007 with a forty-foot container full of donated books, furnishings and school supplies, Mrs. Harris and a team of three dedicated San Diegans rebuilt and furnished the school, provided a generator for electricity, and fixed the community’s well. Malia’s team had enough furnishings and supplies to help three other nearby schools.

go Vision
Guided by our mission statement and carried out through current initiatives, the vision of Growing Liberia’s Children is to facilitate a shared process of educational and economic development with a focus on long-term project sustainability, investment, and ultimate ownership by the people of Liberia.

source url Mission
The mission of GLC is to raise awareness and resources to provide educational opportunities for the children and youth of Liberia.

This video was produced by a GLC intern – Matthew Hicks is a senior at High Tech High International in San Diego, CA. He is an aspiring entrepreneur with a keen interest in the media arts. Matthew has been involved in fundraising activities for Growing Liberia’s Children since age 10.

Current Initiatives

Monthly contribution to faculty salary

Monthly contribution to faculty salary

Sponsoring of student tuition

Sponsoring of student tuition

Continuing renovation to the school facility

Continuing renovation to the school facility

Provision of material assets such as books, computers, furnishings, etc.

Provision of material assets such as books, computers, furnishings, etc.

Providing for continuing education and professional development for teachers

Providing for continuing education and professional development for teachers

Continued fundraising and grant seeking

Continued fundraising and grant seeking

Liberia's Needs

The only thing most of Liberia’s children learned about during 14 years of civil war was the devastation of war — violence, rape, hunger, and fear. But now you can give a child hope.

Liberia is America’s African sister nation, founded as a republic in 1847 by freed African-American slaves. But in 1980, that republic began to crumble as military coups and civil war claimed the lives of over 250,000 Liberians, displaced over a million more, and completely devastated the country’s infrastructure and economy.

With the help of the Liberian Women’s Prayer Movement and the international community, peace returned to Liberia. In 2005, the Liberian people elected their first female president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a Harvard-educated administrator and economist. President Johnson is dedicated to rebuilding Liberia and fighting corruption. But with the infrastructure and economy in ruins, this task is enormous. Most people live on less than $1.00 U.S. per day and the unemployment rate is about 85%.

During the war, most schools and universities closed and many children were forced to become soldiers or sex slaves. Almost an entire generation of children had no hope of an education or a future until now.

A majority of Liberia’s children still have no opportunity to attend school. Those who can attend often receive a marginal education because of the lack of funding for university-educated teachers.

We envision and are working towards a time soon when all of Liberia’s children will grow and flourish through access to a quality education.

Our Current Projects